Keep Talking now available through PBS Plus: watch the film today!

Keep Talking, the award-winning debut feature documentary from director Karen Lynn Weinberg, is now available to view on select local PBS stations through PBS Plus. The film, and all 8 bonus never-before-seen clips, is also available to view on the PBS App!

PBS Plus is a syndicated programming service for public television stations. Viewers can access Keep Talking by checking their local PBS listings, or by submitting a request to their local station for Keep Talking.

The film is also available for pre-order on DVD, and will be shipped mid-July. DVDs can currently be pre-ordered for the special price of $19.95 ahead of the release. Pre-order here!

The DVD will include two versions of the film: one version 79 minutes in length and one version 57 minutes in length, as well as English and Spanish subtitles, and 18 never-before-seen extra scenes. A downloadable educational discussion guide will be made available July 2nd.

Keep Talking follows four Alaska Native women fighting to save Kodiak Alutiiq, an endangered language now spoken by less than 40 remaining fluent Native Elders. Their small community travels to remote Afognak Island to start teaching kids Alutiiq. Keep Talking reveals the ultimate impact of language and culture revitalization; joy and hope.

The film world premiered at the 2017 Vancouver International Film Festival, where it earned a Special Mention in the festival’s Impact Category. Keep Talking won First Place in the 2017 Anchorage International Film Festival’s ‘Made in Alaska’ competition, the film’s Alaska premiere.

Keep Talking is the directorial debut of film editor and producer Karen Lynn Weinberg, who previously worked on films including Spilled Water (2014), Racing Dreams (2009), and Frozen River (2008). After traveling to Kodiak, Alaska in February of 2012 as a film instructor, Weinberg learned that her editing class was made up of culture bearers working to preserve their endangered Native language. A filmmaker with a passion for language, Weinberg was thrilled when the Native Village of Afognak consulted with Elders and agreed to allow her to film their first attempt at a language immersion camp. As filming continued over the next five years, Weinberg immersed herself in Alaska Native history, with a focus on Kodiak Alutiiq history. She studied endangered language revitalization challenges, methodologies and rewards.

“As a filmmaker, I have often wondered what could be gained by decreasing my screen time and increasing my sense of cultural connection (I am a secular Jew). I think that’s why I was so captivated by the Kodiak Alutiiq community; they were drawing such strength and joy from their language revitalization efforts. These learners and Elders are actively engaged in interpersonal connection as they transmit cultural knowledge from one generation to the next. I thought, they are onto something really special here. I wanted to understand what drove them, and why it was such a powerful force,” said Weinberg.

Keep Talking is directed and produced by Karen Lynn Weinberg, executive produced by Justine Nagan, Gordon Quinn and Betsy Steinberg, co-produced by Trish Dalton, Rachel Rozycki and Kari Sherod. Cinematography by Nara Garber, edited by Lesley Kubistal. Produced by Ten Trees Productions, Kartemquin, and Vision Maker Media.

Pre-order the film on DVD here.

Keep Talking and Director/Producer Karen Weinberg travel to CoLang 2018

On Wednesday, June 27, Keep Talking and director/producer Karen Weinberg will travel to Gainesville, Florida, for the University of Florida Department of Linguistics' Institute on Collaborative Language Research (CoLang) 2018. The film will screen at 7PM, and include a post-screening discussion with Weinberg. 

The institute is designed to provide the opportunity for community language activists and linguists to receive training in community-based language documentation and revitalization.

Find additional details here.

Keep Talking available through PBS Plus starting July 2; DVD now available for pre-order

Keep Talking, the award-winning debut feature documentary from director Karen Lynn Weinberg, will be available to view on select local PBS stations through PBS Plus beginning July 2nd!

PBS Plus is a syndicated programming service for public television stations. Viewers can access Keep Talking by checking their local PBS listings, or by submitting a request to their local station for Keep Talking.

The film will also be available to pre-order on DVD through July 2nd. DVDs can currently be pre-ordered for the special price of $19.95 ahead of the release. Pre-order here!

The DVD will include two versions of the film: one version 79 minutes in length and one version 57 minutes in length, as well as English and Spanish subtitles, and 18 never-before-seen extra scenes. A downloadable educational discussion guide will be made available July 2nd.

Keep Talking follows four Alaska Native women fighting to save Kodiak Alutiiq, an endangered language now spoken by less than 40 remaining fluent Native Elders. Their small community travels to remote Afognak Island to start teaching kids Alutiiq. Keep Talking reveals the ultimate impact of language and culture revitalization; joy and hope.

The film world premiered at the 2017 Vancouver International Film Festival, where it earned a Special Mention in the festival’s Impact Category. Keep Talking won First Place in the 2017 Anchorage International Film Festival’s ‘Made in Alaska’ competition, the film’s Alaska premiere.

Keep Talking is the directorial debut of film editor and producer Karen Lynn Weinberg, who previously worked on films including Spilled Water (2014), Racing Dreams (2009), and Frozen River (2008). After traveling to Kodiak, Alaska in February of 2012 as a film instructor, Weinberg learned that her editing class was made up of culture bearers working to preserve their endangered Native language. A filmmaker with a passion for language, Weinberg was thrilled when the Native Village of Afognak consulted with Elders and agreed to allow her to film their first attempt at a language immersion camp. As filming continued over the next five years, Weinberg immersed herself in Alaska Native history, with a focus on Kodiak Alutiiq history. She studied endangered language revitalization challenges, methodologies and rewards.

“As a filmmaker, I have often wondered what could be gained by decreasing my screen time and increasing my sense of cultural connection (I am a secular Jew). I think that’s why I was so captivated by the Kodiak Alutiiq community; they were drawing such strength and joy from their language revitalization efforts. These learners and Elders are actively engaged in interpersonal connection as they transmit cultural knowledge from one generation to the next. I thought, they are onto something really special here. I wanted to understand what drove them, and why it was such a powerful force,” said Weinberg.

Keep Talking is directed and produced by Karen Lynn Weinberg, executive produced by Justine Nagan, Gordon Quinn and Betsy Steinberg, co-produced by Trish Dalton, Rachel Rozycki and Kari Sherod. Cinematography by Nara Garber, edited by Lesley Kubistal. Produced by Ten Trees Productions, Kartemquin, and Vision Maker Media.

Pre-order the film on DVD here.

Keep Talking DVD now available for pre-order at special price of $19.95!

Award-winning Keep Talking is now available for pre-order at the special price of $19.95! DVDs ship July 2nd.

The DVD includes:

  • Two versions of the film (79 minute and 57 minute)
  • English and Spanish subtitles
  • 18 never-before-seen extra scenes, including A New Word for 'Tweet'Dancing is for Men, and The Eldest Elder
  • Downloadable educational discussion guide (available July 2nd)

ABOUT THE FILM
Keep Talking follows four Alaska Native women fighting to save Kodiak Alutiiq, an endangered language now spoken by less than 40 remaining fluent Native Elders. Their small community travels to remote Afognak Island to start teaching kids Alutiiq. Sadie, 13, is inspired to begin learning the language and dances of her ancestors. Instead of getting swept up in the wake of historical trauma, these women overcome personal demons and build toward a brighter future. Keep Talking reveals the ultimate impact of language and culture revitalization; joy and hope.

**WINNER - Made In Alaska Competition - 2017 Anchorage International Film Festival**
**SPECIAL MENTION - Impact Category - 2017 Vancouver International Film Festival**

Praise for Keep Talking
"Weinberg's film, much in the spirit of Kartemquin's exceptional documentaries, is an observed, clear and enlightening look at a struggle that is unfortunately underexposed."
– Nelson Carvajal, Free Cinema Now

"A joyous celebration of the fellowship and community that centers around something as unifying as language."
– Clint Worthington, Alcohollywood

"Powerful...gives the viewer a true understanding of the need to not lose our culture."
– Pamela Powell, Reel Honest Reviews

Keep Talking... puts Weinberg on the list of filmmakers to keep an eye on... the film demonstrates how language can heal historical trauma, restore cultural practices and help strengthen the identity of young Alaska Natives.”
The Anchorage Press

“A must see documentary.”
- Ariadne Sawyer, The Afro News

“A story filled with hope and heart."
Filmed in Canada

“A deftly-woven ode to language as identity and community."
- Zoe Grams, 24hrs Vancouver

“Shines a light on the power of preserving language and culture as a way of collective healing."
-Tania Ehret, Rabble.CA

Find all upcoming screenings for Keep Talking here. For more information, visit the film's official website or follow the film on Facebook and Twitter.

Keep Talking plays Kodiak Crabfest; Heritage Celebration in Juneau

Keep Talking, the award-winning directorial debut from Karen Lynn Weinberg, travels back to Alaska for three screenings this May and June!

The Kodiak Crab Festival is produced annually by the Kodiak Chamber of Commerce for the Kodiak community, and is intended to celebrate the abundance of resources the community receives from the sea.

The theme of Sealaska Heritage Celebration 2018 is "Respect: Weigh Your Words." The fest runs from June 6-9 and includes art markets, dance performances and film showings.

The film world premiered at the 2017 Vancouver International Film Festival, where it earned a special mention in the fest's "Impact" category, and made its Alaska premiere at the 2017 Anchorage International Film Festival, where it won First Place in the fest's 'Made in Alaska' competition.

The film won the first place prize in the 'Made in Alaska' category at the Anchorage International Film Festival.

Praise for Keep Talking
"Weinberg's film, much in the spirit of Kartemquin's exceptional documentaries, is an observed, clear and enlightening look at a struggle that is unfortunately underexposed."
– Nelson Carvajal, Free Cinema Now

"A joyous celebration of the fellowship and community that centers around something as unifying as language."
– Clint Worthington, Alcohollywood

"Powerful...gives the viewer a true understanding of the need to not lose our culture."
– Pamela Powell, Reel Honest Reviews

Keep Talking... puts Weinberg on the list of filmmakers to keep an eye on... the film demonstrates how language can heal historical trauma, restore cultural practices and help strengthen the identity of young Alaska Natives.”
The Anchorage Press

“A must see documentary.”
- Ariadne Sawyer, The Afro News

“A story filled with hope and heart."
Filmed in Canada

“A deftly-woven ode to language as identity and community."
- Zoe Grams, 24hrs Vancouver

“Shines a light on the power of preserving language and culture as a way of collective healing."
-Tania Ehret, Rabble.CA

Find all upcoming screenings for Keep Talking here. For more information, visit the film's official website or follow the film on Facebook and Twitter.

Keep Talking makes its D.C. premiere tomorrow!

Award-winning Keep Talking will make its D.C. premiere tomorrow, February 21 at 7PM, at the Mother Tongue Film Festival as the fest's opening night film. The film will screen at the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian Rasmuson Theater.

The screening is free and open to the public. Director Karen Lynn Weinberg, film participant and language warrior Sadie Coyle, cinematographer Nara Garber, film participant and Alutiiq Language Advocate Dr. Alisha Drabek and executive producer Gordon Quinn will be present for a post-screening Q&A!

Details here.

The Mother Tongue Film Festival is a collaboration between Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian, the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage, and Recovering Voices.

The film won the first place prize in the 'Made in Alaska' category at the Anchorage International Film Festival.

Praise for Keep Talking
"Weinberg's film, much in the spirit of Kartemquin's exceptional documentaries, is an observed, clear and enlightening look at a struggle that is unfortunately underexposed."
– Nelson Carvajal, Free Cinema Now

"A joyous celebration of the fellowship and community that centers around something as unifying as language."
– Clint Worthington, Alcohollywood

"Powerful...gives the viewer a true understanding of the need to not lose our culture."
– Pamela Powell, Reel Honest Reviews

Keep Talking... puts Weinberg on the list of filmmakers to keep an eye on... the film demonstrates how language can heal historical trauma, restore cultural practices and help strengthen the identity of young Alaska Natives.”
The Anchorage Press

“A must see documentary.”
- Ariadne Sawyer, The Afro News

“A story filled with hope and heart."
Filmed in Canada

“A deftly-woven ode to language as identity and community."
- Zoe Grams, 24hrs Vancouver

“Shines a light on the power of preserving language and culture as a way of collective healing."
-Tania Ehret, Rabble.CA

Find all upcoming screenings for Keep Talking here. For more information, visit the film's official website or follow the film on Facebook and Twitter.

Keep Talking has its Chicago premiere this Friday!

Keep Talking by Karen Lynn Weinberg will have its Chicago premiere at the Gene Siskel Film Center on Friday, January 5th at 8:15pm. A pre-screening reception begins at 7pm. A second showing will take place on January 11th at 8:15PM. Tickets here.

Post-screening discussion panelists:

  • 1/5/18: Director Karen Lynn Weinberg, co-producer Rachel Rozycki and Alutiiq Language Advocate Dr. Alisha Drabek; moderated by Dorene Wiese, CEO of the American Indian Association of Illinois
  • 1/11/18: Director Karen Lynn Weinberg, co-producer Rachel Rozycki and Professor and Chair of the Department of Linguistics and Humanities, Lenore A. Grenoble; moderated by Dorene Wiese, CEO of the American Indian Association of Illinois.

Keep Talking follows four Alaska Native women fighting to save Kodiak Alutiiq, an endangered language now spoken by less than 40 remaining fluent Native Elders. Their small community travels to remote Afognak Island to start teaching kids Alutiiq. Sadie, 13, is inspired to begin learning the language and dances of her ancestors. Instead of getting swept up in the wake of historical trauma, these women overcome personal demons and build toward a brighter future. Keep Talking reveals the ultimate impact of language and culture revitalization; joy and hope.

Ahead of the premiere, Weinberg and Drabek were interviewed on WBEZ Worldview.

Praise for Keep Talking
"Weinberg's film, much in the spirit of Kartemquin's exceptional documentaries, is an observed, clear and enlightening look at a struggle that is unfortunately underexposed."
– Nelson Carvajal, Free Cinema Now

"A joyous celebration of the fellowship and community that centers around something as unifying as language."
– Clint Worthington, Alcohollywood

"Powerful...gives the viewer a true understanding of the need to not lose our culture."
– Pamela Powell, Reel Honest Reviews

Keep Talking... puts Weinberg on the list of filmmakers to keep an eye on... the film demonstrates how language can heal historical trauma, restore cultural practices and help strengthen the identity of young Alaska Natives.”
The Anchorage Press

“A must see documentary.”
- Ariadne Sawyer, The Afro News

“A story filled with hope and heart."
Filmed in Canada

“A deftly-woven ode to language as identity and community."
- Zoe Grams, 24hrs Vancouver

“Shines a light on the power of preserving language and culture as a way of collective healing."
-Tania Ehret, Rabble.CA

Find all upcoming screenings of Keep Talking here.

Keep Talking wins 1st place in 'Made in Alaska' competition at AIFF

 Keep Talking took home the 1st place prize in the 'Made in Alaska' program at the 2017 Anchorage International Film Festival this past Sunday! Read the official announcement here.

The film also earned a special mention in the Vancouver International Film Festival's "Impact" category following its World Premiere at VIFF.

Praise for Keep Talking
Keep Talking... puts Weinberg on the list of filmmakers to keep an eye on... the film demonstrates how language can heal historical trauma, restore cultural practices and help strengthen the identity of young Alaska Natives.”
The Anchorage Press

“A must see documentary.”
- Ariadne Sawyer, The Afro News

“A story filled with hope and heart."
Filmed in Canada

“A deftly-woven ode to language as identity and community."
- Zoe Grams, 24hrs Vancouver

“Shines a light on the power of preserving language and culture as a way of collective healing."
-Tania Ehret, Rabble.CA

The film recently came home to Kodiak, Alaska, for a particularly special screening with the Alutiiq Nation Festival at the Afognak Native Corporation.

Keep Talking comes to the Anchorage Museum, AIFF

Keep Talking, the directorial debut from Karen Weinberg, will travel to its home state to screen both at the Anchorage Museum for a special preview screening before its Alaska premiere at the Anchorage International Film Festival.

The film will screen at the Anchorage Museum on November 30th at 6PM, followed by a panel discussion. The program is free and open to the public.

The film world premiered on October 3rd at the Vancouver International Film Festival.

Praise for Keep Talking

  • "A deftly-woven ode to language as identity and community."–
  • "A look forward to women as the guardians of their culture, and agents of change."–rabble.ca
  • "Keep Talking has the power to reach out to all the peoples of the world, First Nations and others concerned about the many endangered languages of the world...A must see documentary." –The Afro News

Find all upcoming screenings for Keep Talking here. For more information, visit the film's official website or follow the film on Facebook and Twitter.

Keep Talking world premieres tonight at VIFF! Watch the official trailer.

Tonight is the world premiere of director Karen Lynn Weinberg’s debut documentary,, at the Vancouver International Film Festival, the film screens at 6:30PM, with an additional screening on October 5 at 10:45AM. The prestigious festival (now in its 36th year) is dedicated to promoting understanding of the world’s cultures through the art of cinema. Purchase tickets here.

The film will be featured in the fest's Impact Stream, featuring uncompromising documentaries that seek to change the way viewers see the world.

Keep Talking follows four Alaska Native women fighting to save Kodiak Alutiiq, an endangered language now spoken by less than 40 remaining fluent Native Elders. Their small community travels to remote Afognak Island to start teaching kids Alutiiq. At the camp, Sadie, a troubled teen, is inspired to begin learning the language and dances of her ancestors. Over the next 5 years the women overcome historical and personal traumas to find joy and hope in the revitalization of their cultural heritage.

The film is the directorial debut of film editor and producer Karen Lynn Weinberg, who previously worked on films including Spilled Water (2014), Racing Dreams (2009), and Frozen River (2008). After traveling to Kodiak, Alaska in February of 2012 as a film instructor, Weinberg learned that her editing class was made up of culture bearers working to preserve their endangered Native language. A filmmaker with a passion for language, Weinberg was thrilled when the Native Village of Afognak met with Elders and they agreed to allow her to film their first attempt at a language immersion camp. As filming continued over the next five years, Weinberg immersed herself in Alaska Native history, with a focus on Kodiak Alutiiq history. She studied endangered language revitalization challenges, methodologies and rewards.

“As a filmmaker, I have often wondered what could be gained by decreasing my screen time and increasing my sense of cultural connection (I am a secular Jew). I think that’s why I was so captivated by the Kodiak Alutiiq community; they were drawing such strength and joy from their language revitalization efforts. These learners and Elders are actively engaged in interpersonal connection as they transmit cultural knowledge from one generation to the next. I thought, they are onto something really special here. I wanted to understand what drove them, and why it was such a powerful force.” said Weinberg.

Weinberg followed the Alutiiq community’s language revitalization movement up close and from afar, while staying in close contact with the main film subjects. Spending additional time talking, meeting and participating in language events, both with and without cameras, allowed her to better understand community intricacies, personal challenges and rewards.

“I was fortunate to work with Kari Sherod, a member of the Kodiak Alutiiq community, as a co-producer. Valuable advice was also offered by experts within the community and we built an outside advisory board of experts as well. A final crucial step was signoff on the film by the Elders Council, which we gratefully received. All of these collaborators helped me to understand the layers of sensitivity and emotion packed into language revitalization, and the lasting impact of historical trauma. As the film began to take shape, I held multiple private and small group screenings because community feedback and signoff on a project like this is key,” said Weinberg.

UNESCO estimates that at least 43% of the estimated 6000 languages spoken in the world are endangered. National Geographic estimates that one language dies every 2 weeks. With each language that is lost, we lose the collective knowledge embedded within that language, and that culture loses their richest tie to ancestral heritage, wisdom and self expression.

Keep Talking is directed and produced by Karen Lynn Weinberg, executive produced by Justine Nagan, Gordon Quinn and Betsy Steinberg, co-produced by Trish Dalton, Rachel Rozycki and Kari Sherod. Cinematography by Nara Garber, edited by Lesley Kubistal and produced by Ten Trees Productions, Kartemquin Films and Vision Maker Media.

Websitehttp://www.keeptalkingthefilm.com/
Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/keeptalkingthefilm/
Twitterhttps://twitter.com/KeepTalkingFilm

Keep Talking funded by Vision Maker Media

We're delighted to announce that Vision Maker Media has awarded a grant of $100,000 towards post-production on Keep Talking, directed and produced by Karen Weinberg.

With funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), Vision Maker Media's Public Media Content Fundawards support to projects with a Native American theme and significant Native American involvement that ultimately benefits the entire Public Media community. Keep Talking is one of just six projects to receive funding this year. This is the first time a Kartemquin project has received a Vision Maker Media grant, and we are honored to begin a working relationship with them on Keep Talking. The grant means that the film will eventually be broadcast on PBS.

Keep Talking tells the story of one community working to preserve their endangered language and culture. Kodiak Alutiiq Elders of Alaska's Gulf Coast are among the victims of systematic assimilation and abuse, first by Russian occupation, then by the United States government. Now with less than 50 fluent Native speakers of Kodiak Alutiiq remaining, three young Alutiiq women battle the resulting historical trauma and discover that saving their language is truly a matter of life and death.

"This funding is an enormous step towards finishing our film," said Karen Weinberg. "The grant allows us to do our final shoot in July 2016, and we have the added gift that we get to work with an editor moving forward. The edit begins in one week! We have been filming since the first Dig Afognak language immersion camp in 2013 and have amassed a great deal of footage; the film is starting come together. We are thrilled to join the other talented Vision Maker filmmakers amplifying Native voices. Quyanaa (thank you) Vision Maker Media!"