Keep Talking available through PBS Plus starting July 2; DVD now available for pre-order

Keep Talking, the award-winning debut feature documentary from director Karen Lynn Weinberg, will be available to view on select local PBS stations through PBS Plus beginning July 2nd!

PBS Plus is a syndicated programming service for public television stations. Viewers can access Keep Talking by checking their local PBS listings, or by submitting a request to their local station for Keep Talking.

The film will also be available to pre-order on DVD through July 2nd. DVDs can currently be pre-ordered for the special price of $19.95 ahead of the release. Pre-order here!

The DVD will include two versions of the film: one version 79 minutes in length and one version 57 minutes in length, as well as English and Spanish subtitles, and 18 never-before-seen extra scenes. A downloadable educational discussion guide will be made available July 2nd.

Keep Talking follows four Alaska Native women fighting to save Kodiak Alutiiq, an endangered language now spoken by less than 40 remaining fluent Native Elders. Their small community travels to remote Afognak Island to start teaching kids Alutiiq. Keep Talking reveals the ultimate impact of language and culture revitalization; joy and hope.

The film world premiered at the 2017 Vancouver International Film Festival, where it earned a Special Mention in the festival’s Impact Category. Keep Talking won First Place in the 2017 Anchorage International Film Festival’s ‘Made in Alaska’ competition, the film’s Alaska premiere.

Keep Talking is the directorial debut of film editor and producer Karen Lynn Weinberg, who previously worked on films including Spilled Water (2014), Racing Dreams (2009), and Frozen River (2008). After traveling to Kodiak, Alaska in February of 2012 as a film instructor, Weinberg learned that her editing class was made up of culture bearers working to preserve their endangered Native language. A filmmaker with a passion for language, Weinberg was thrilled when the Native Village of Afognak consulted with Elders and agreed to allow her to film their first attempt at a language immersion camp. As filming continued over the next five years, Weinberg immersed herself in Alaska Native history, with a focus on Kodiak Alutiiq history. She studied endangered language revitalization challenges, methodologies and rewards.

“As a filmmaker, I have often wondered what could be gained by decreasing my screen time and increasing my sense of cultural connection (I am a secular Jew). I think that’s why I was so captivated by the Kodiak Alutiiq community; they were drawing such strength and joy from their language revitalization efforts. These learners and Elders are actively engaged in interpersonal connection as they transmit cultural knowledge from one generation to the next. I thought, they are onto something really special here. I wanted to understand what drove them, and why it was such a powerful force,” said Weinberg.

Keep Talking is directed and produced by Karen Lynn Weinberg, executive produced by Justine Nagan, Gordon Quinn and Betsy Steinberg, co-produced by Trish Dalton, Rachel Rozycki and Kari Sherod. Cinematography by Nara Garber, edited by Lesley Kubistal. Produced by Ten Trees Productions, Kartemquin, and Vision Maker Media.

Pre-order the film on DVD here.